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Did Hinduism know about sphericity of Earth - hindufaqs.com

Vedic mathematics were the first and foremost source of knowledge . Selflessly shared by ‪‎Hindus‬ to all around the ‪world‬. The Hindu FAQs Will answer some discoveries around the world which may have existed in Vedic Hindusim. And as I always say, We wont judge, We will just write the article, its you who should know whether to accept it or reject it. We Need open mind to read this article. Read and learn about our unbelievable history . It will blow your mind ! ! !

But first, let me state Stigler’s law of eponymy:
“No scientific discovery is named after its original discoverer.”
Funny isn’t it.

Lets discuss about sphericity of Earth according to ancient Hindu Mythology. As I believe, until unless we been to space, one cannot describe the planetary motions or features of the solar systems, cosmos, exact timing etc. Just read and go through the amount of details provided but our Ancient Hindu Scripts, these are just a few.

1. Sphericity of Earth:
The existence of rather advanced concepts like the sphericity of Earth and the cause of seasons is quite clear in Vedic literature. For example, the Aitareya Brahmana (3.44) declares:
The Sun does never set nor rise. When people think the Sun is setting it is not so. For after having arrived at the end of the day it makes itself produce two opposite effects, making night to what is below and day to what is on the other side Having reached the end of the night, it makes itself produce two opposite effects, making day to what is below and night to what is on the other side. In fact, the Sun never sets. Shape of Earth is like an Oblate Spheroid.
(Rig VedaXXX. IV.V)

‘Earth is flattened at the poles’ (Markandeya Purana 54.12)

Earth is flattened at the poles
Earth is flattened at the poles’

“Sixty-four centuries before Isaac Newton, the Hindu Rig-Veda asserted that gravitation held the universe together. The Sanskrit speaking Aryans subscribed to the idea of a spherical earth in an era when the Greeks believed in a flat one. The Indians of the fifth century A.D. calculated the age of the earth as 4.3 billion years; scientists in 19th century England were convinced it was 100 million years.”

2. Polar Days and Nights
For the period when the sun is north it is visible for six months at the North Pole and invisible at the south, and vice versa. – (Ibid Sutara)

Motion of the sun at poles
Sun doesnot set for six months in poles.

Modern Science says about this:
June 21, 1999: Later today, at 19:49 UT (3:49 p.m. EDT), Earth’s north pole points more directly at the Sun than at any other time during the year. For polar bears and other denizens of the Arctic it will be noontime, the middle of a 6-month long day, as the Sun climbs to 23 1/2 degrees above the horizon.
June 21st marks the beginning of summer in the Northern Hemisphere and the beginning of winter in the Southern Hemisphere. In the North it’s the longest day of the year. At mid-latitudes there is sunlight for over 16 hours. Above the Arctic Circle the sun doesn’t set at all!

“He made this Earth fixed by different devices like hills and mountains in shape of pegs but it still rotates. Sun never sets; all parts of earth are not in Darkness.” [RIG VEDA]

Credits: Post Credits AIUFO
Photo Credits: Wiki
Polar Days and Nights Photo Credits to the owner

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Satyavati (mother of vyasa) was the daughter of a cursed apsara (celestial nymph) named Adrika. Adrika was transformed by a curse into a fish, and lived in the Yamuna river. When the Chedi king, Vasu (better-known as Uparicara-vasu), was on a hunting expedition he had a nocturnal emission while dreaming of his wife. He sent his semen to his queen with an eagle but, due to a fight with another eagle, the semen dropped into the river and was swallowed by the cursed Adrika-fish. Consequently, the fish became pregnant.

The chief fisherman caught the fish, and cut it open. He found two babies in the womb of the fish: one male and one female. The fisherman presented the children to the king, who kept the male child. The boy grew up to become the founder of the Matsya Kingdom. The king gave the female child to the fisherman, naming her Matsya-gandhi or Matsya-gandha (“She who has the smell of fish”) due to the fishy odor which came from the girl’s body. The fisherman raised the girl as his daughter and named her Kali (“the dark one”) because of her complexion. Over the course of time, Kali earned the name Satyavati (“truthful”). The fisherman was also a ferryman, ferrying people across the river in his boat. Satyavati helped her father in his job, and grew up into a beautiful maiden.

One day,when she was ferrying the rishi (sage) Parashara across the river Yamuna, the sage wanted Kali to satisfy his lust and held her right hand. She tried to dissuade Parashara, saying that a learned Brahmin of his stature should not desire a woman who stinks of fish. She finally gave in, realizing the desperation and persistence of the sage and fearing that if she did not heed to his request, he might topple the boat midstream. Kali agreed, and told Parashara to be patient until the boat reached the bank.

On reaching the other side the sage grabbed her again, but she declared that her body stank and coitus should be delightful to them both. At these words, Matsyagandha was transformed (by the powers of the sage) into Yojanagandha (“she whose fragrance can be smelled from across a yojana”). She now smelled of musk, and so was called  Kasturi-gandhi (“musk-fragrant”).

When Parashara, tormented with desire, approached her again she insisted that the act was not appropriate in broad daylight, as her father and others would see them from the other bank; they should wait till night. The sage, with his powers, shrouded the entire area in fog. Before Parashara could enjoy himself Satyavati again interrupted him to say that he would enjoy himself and depart, robbing her of her virginity and leaving her shamed in society. The sage then blessed her with virgo intacta. She asked Parashara to promise her that the coitus would be a secret and her virginity intact; the son born from their union would be as famous as the great sage; and her fragrance and youth would be eternal.

Parashara granted her these wishes and was satiated by the beautiful Satyavati. After the act the sage bathed in the river and left, never to meet her again. The Mahabharata abridges the story, noting only two wishes for Satyavati: her virgo intacta and everlasting sweet fragrance.

vyasa

Ecstatic with her blessings, Satyavati gave birth to her baby the same day on an island in the Yamuna. The son immediately grew up as a youth and promised his mother that he would come to her aid every time she called on him; he then left to do penance in the forest. The son was called Krishna(“the dark one”) due to his colour, or Dvaipayana (“one born on an island”) and would later became known as Vyasa – compiler of the Vedas and author of the Puranas and the Mahabharata, fulfilling Parashara’s prophecy.

Credits: Navratn Singh

1. No one can push a boulder away while standing on it; you cannot be free from anxiety while all the entrances through which it sneaks in are open.
— Atharvana Veda


2. Delusion arises from anger. The mind is bewildered by delusion. Reasoning is destroyed when the mind is bewildered. One falls down when reasoning is destroyed.
— Bhagvat Gita


3. (Lead Us) From the Unreal To the Real,
From Darkness To Light,
From Death To Immortality,
Peace Peace Peace.
– Brihadaranyaka Upanishad


4. Thus occupied by many egoistic ideas, deluded, addicted to the gratification of desire (doing works, but doing them wrongly, acting mightily, but for themselves, for desire, for enjoyment, not for God in themselves and God in man), they fall into the unclean hell of their own evil.

— Bhagvat Gita


5. “Who really knows?
Who will here proclaim it?
Whence was it produced? Whence is this creation?
The gods came afterwards, with the creation of this universe.
Who then knows whence it has arisen?”
— Rig Veda


Karmanye Vadhikaraste, Ma phaleshou kada chana,
Ma Karma Phala Hetur Bhurmatey Sangostva Akarmani


6. Let the fruit not be the purpose of your actions, and therefore you won’t be attached to not doing your duty. You have the right to perform your actions, but you are not entitled to the fruits of the actions.
— Bhagvat Gita


7. There is no happiness for him who does not travel, Rohita!
Thus we have heard. Living in the society of men, the best man becomes a sinner… therefore, wander!… The fortune of him who is sitting, sits; it rises when he rises; it sleeps when he sleeps; it moves when he moves. Therefore, wander!”
— Rig Veda


8. (There is) just one divinity, manifestly hidden everywhere
Pervading everything, the soul of every living creature.
The one that directs the actions of all and lives across all times.
Witness to everything, pure and perfect, devoid of all (worldly) qualities and attributes.
— Shvetashwataro Upanishad (credit: Som Bhatta)


9. The stalks of water-flowers are proportionate to the depth of water; so is humans greatness proportionate to their minds (Knowledge).
— Tirukural


10. “Do not be led by others, awaken your own mind, amass your own experience, and decide for yourself your own path.”
–The Atharva Veda

Utlimately, Hinduism is about happiness. If you can find eternal happiness doing something, you are on the right path.